How much does a vertical farm cost? Maybe my farm can help you guess

I spend a lot of time looking at Google data to see specifically what people are interested in for vertical farming. Resoundingly, it’s how to do it and how much it costs. But unfortunately, asking any professional in the field right now those questions is like pulling teeth. No one wants to talk, no one wants to answer them.Hydroponic Lettuce

To be fair, part of that is because they’re extremely hard questions. I know because I’ve been asked them. Often people write vague emails with just a rough sketch of an idea in mind and expect me to do all the legwork for them. However, because each situation for a farm is so different (where are you doing it? what kind of space do you have access to? who are you selling to? etc.), it becomes impossible to answer.

People are of course resoundingly polite and friendly about it, but it feels like you never walk away with enough information.  I want to change that. While I already made this announcement on my email list (if you haven’t signed up already, check it out – there’s more early access announcements and even more content you’ll get there than what’s on the site), I want to put it out here as well.

I finally finished a deal on a space to start my own commercial hydroponics farm.

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Problems with vertical farm designs

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It’s no wonder vertical farmers get so much flack when faulty architectural designs are at the heart of the public’s perception of vertical farms. When architects aren’t farmers, some serious design flaws slip into their vertical farm concepts. Any serious reader of this blog could write this piece about most of the concept farms that seem to come out every week, but let’s tackle a few of the obvious flaws with this one.

when architects aren't farmers: problems with vertical farm design

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2 Story Vertical Farm Packs Inside A Shipping Container

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The “Impact Farm” is a 2 story DIY vertical farm that packs into a shipping container. Designed by Human Habitat’s Ronnie Markussen and Mikkel Kjær, this is a beautiful example of shipping container design that increases production while still gaining the flexibility inherent in modular design.

2 Story Farm (1)
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Vertical Farming Could Cut 20% off Global Emissions

Author Kyle Simpson is the founder of Local Loop Farms, a startup turning food waste into fresh food through integrated ecosystems inspired by nature. To get more great content from the Urban Vertical Project and partners like Kyle, sign up here!

Kyle is going to breakdown, category by category, how switching to vertical farming could cut 20% of our global greenhouse gas emissions. 

You’ve probably heard before that the Earth’s population will have an additional billion people within ten years, 2.5 billion over the next 35 years, and that nearly two-thirds of this global population is expected to live in a city during this time.[1, 2] You may have even heard that feeding these new generations will require humanity to increase food production by 70% over our current levels of production.[3]

The catch, however, is that food production and consumption already accounts for 19% to 29% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, larger than emissions from the energy or transportation sectors.[4, 5]

Cut Emissions by 20% and Grow More
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Martian Food Tech Crash Landing On A Farm Near You

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“Hell yeah I’m a botanist! Fear my botany powers!” – Mark Watney

The newest space film The Martian predicts a future where plant knowledge is not only imperative for human advancement but for astronaut Mark Watney’s very survival. I was just at the NASA headquarters in Washington, DC  and even the best minds there weren’t immune to the buzz around this fall’s hottest flick, constantly asking how Veggie, NASA’s new micro-gravity plant growth system, will be used on Mars. During the entire meeting, I was conscious of something important: a synthesis between vertical farming technologies and space exploration that goes far deeper than what the general public seems to realize. Keep reading to learn more about:

  • Veggie, NASA’s new way to grow food in space
  • Plant pillow propagation
  • What farming on Mars would even look like

space farm vertical hydroponic farming
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